Tag Archives: IPR

IPR GROWS ITS OFFERING TO MAKE CUSTOMERS MORE PRODUCTIVE

Having built its reputation as a responsive and reliable partner in the field of dewatering, heavy duty slurry pump and dredging, IPR is now well positioned to provide customers with all they need.

Managing Director Lee Vine says that the company’s success is a combination of quality global brands and solid home-grown expertise. This allows IPR not only to represent and market the highest quality of equipment, but also to specify optimal solutions and design customised products that support customers’ efficient operation.

“Our professionalism over the years has led us into partnerships with the world’s leading pump manufacturers,” says Vine. “Among these collaborations is our role as master distributor for Atlas Copco dewatering pumps in southern Africa, as well as our agency across sub-Saharan Africa for the Toyo range of specialised heavy duty submersible slurry pumps.”

These brands, he explains, are today the core of a comprehensive rental fleet that drives IPR’s vision of becoming the leading player in dewatering and heavy duty slurry pumping. The IPR fleet has everything a customer needs – from electrical submersible pumps to diesel-driven pump sets – for a quick and sustainable response. Its success to date has also been underpinned by its design expertise and modern workshop facilities.

“Our understanding of our customers’ challenges, combined with our technical prowess, has allowed us to locally develop and manufacture the innovative SlurrySucker dredging system, for instance,” he says. Designed to safely and efficiently cleaning settlement dams or process ponds, the SlurrySucker can remove up to 60 dry tonnes per hour – without the risk of damaging pond liners with heavy excavating equipment.

IPR Sales Manager Steve du Toit highlights that IPR’s offering of both rental units and capital purchases has a hidden benefit for customers, as they seek to improve their uptime while balancing capital with operating expenditure.

“A rental pump solution – which we provide after a detailed assessment of its planned duty – can often act as a technical trial for a customer,” says Du Toit. “They can demonstrate the pump’s performance during a rental, and purchase their own as and when capital is available. On the other hand, they may prefer contracting out this function, ensuring reliability and uptime.”

The company recently added Olikara’s range of QubePower lighting towers to its offering, which has three different sizes and can be powered by diesel, petrol, solar, battery or mains electricity.

NEXT-GEN SLURRYSUCKER FOR SILT-CHALLENGED WATER AREAS POWERED BY TOYO

Not only does IPR’s SlurrySucker dredging system effectively clean process water ponds, return water dams or other water storage areas, it has become recognised as an ideal solution for cleaning water capture areas where silt is an issue, or where water retention and water holding capacity is being threatened. Some of these areas are environmentally sensitive and must be protected from causing any pollution.

Taking this innovative locally manufactured product to the next step, IPR recently launched its new generation unit – the SlurrySucker MK III. This powerful dredging system now incorporates the world renowned Toyo heavy duty slurry pump, making it the most efficient and cost effective electrically powered floating dredging system available on the market.

This is according to IPR Managing Director, Lee Vine, who says that the benefits of the SlurrySucker extend well beyond improving mines’ environmental footprints. “Bodies of water such as ponds, lagoons, dams and canals should be considered valuable plant assets and must be maintained to maximise their operational efficiency and contribution to optimised operational performance,” he explains.

“This is where the SlurrySucker has continued to deliver without fail, assisting our customers with some of their pressing issues including the need to increase water storage capacities, the recovery of minerals and improving process water quality,” he continues.

Equipped with Toyo heavy duty slurry pumps, the SlurrySucker MK III boasts enhanced solids handling capabilities. The pumps are fitted with robust cutter fans or agitators, facilitating the management of larger particles. Moreover, they can effectively handle slurries with a high specific gravity (SG).

Commenting on the effectiveness of the SlurrySucker MK III, Vine says the unit can be sized to meet an individual plant’s slurry removal requirements in terms of particle size, aggregation, distribution, cohesiveness, flow characteristics, sedimentation rates and specific gravity.

He is quick, however, to point out that while desilting or cleaning of settlement ponds may seem like a simple task, it is not always as straightforward as it would initially appear. Cleaning these facilities can become an onerous task, as it involves the pumping of high solids materials from the facility being desilted and should an incorrect system or equipment that is not fit for the task be specified this could cause issues including environmental harm.

“Historically many operations have used manual excavation methods for desilting and cleaning, but our established track record has proved that this is not only inefficient, but it often fails to remove the required volume of sediment,” Vine says.

There are several ways to accomplish effective desilting, but it has to be done effectively and cost efficiently, and this is where IPR’s skilled and experienced team comes into play. The best option, according to Vine, is a site visit to assess the application requirements and conditions.

“In some instances, it is possible to pump the high solids material to another nearby dam or reservoir. However, this is sometimes not possible and in this type of scenario we implement an alternate solution such as capturing and storing the content in specialised geotextile bags while the water is separated from the solid material,” he explains.

Once the actual condition of the dam or pond has been assessed the decision can be made as to how to proceed. The SlurrySucker itself needs sufficient volume of water on which it can be floated, and should there be areas where this is not possible, then a hydro-mining solution is applied to these drier areas.

“What is also important is that we can effectively ensure mine and industrial water contaminated sites do not negatively affect surrounding areas and being equipped with remote controlled height adjustment of the primary slurry pump and dredge head assembly allows the SlurrySucker to operate without causing damage to plastic liners in dams and settlement ponds.

Vine highlights two product options – the Maxi SlurrySucker which is capable of moving 250 m³ an hour at 20% to 30% by volume – equivalent of approximately 70 dry tons per hour. The Mini SlurrySucker® operates at 100 m³ an hour, again at 20% to 30% by volume for roughly 30 dry tons every hour.

The SlurrySucker comes standard with a galvanised frame structure and IPR’s flexible design provides the option for stainless steel with polyethylene and UV-stabilised pontoons.

In conclusion, Vine says that the opting for the SlurrySucker option is also far safer as the barge itself can be operated remotely from a defined distance away from the dam or pond edge. This is much safer than having equipment and personnel on the dam.

WORLD CLASS LIGHTING TOWERS NOW AT IPR

Having witnessed that customers often need robust and compact on-site lighting, IPR now offers the range of Olikara lighting towers to suit every application.

The specialist pump dewatering company can now provide lighting solutions as part of its package, according to Warren Spann, Business Development Manager at IPR. The Olikara range of QubePower lighting towers includes three different sizes, and can be powered by diesel or petrol engines, solar or battery power, or mains electricity.

“All models share the ability to withstand the rigours of mining, infrastructure and industrial environments,” says Spann. “As a leader in pumping solutions, we can offer the Olikara QubePower range with the same attention to quality, support and maintenance that our customers have become accustomed to.”

At the smaller end of the range is the QubePower Mini – an ultra-compact, petrol driven unit with a 10 foot extendable tower with 400 W LED lights. In the mid-range is the QubePower model, a medium sized lighting tower powered by an air-cooled diesel engine and with its compact footprint this model allows more towers to be carried per truckload.

“For big projects, we offer the QubePower Max, which is a large format tower light powered by a water-cooled diesel engine, ideal for use in extreme and demanding conditions,” he explains. “For customers needing higher specifications, this solution can be enhanced with larger fuel tanks and hydraulically powered towers.”

The range’s QubeSolar model is a tower that runs off green energy, with solar panels and battery storage to ensure long runtimes. The success of the QubePower solutions is demonstrated by their penetration into regions including North America, Asia and Australia. Used in climates where temperatures drop as low as minus 40 degrees C and rise up to 55 degrees C, says Spann, their quality design and manufacture ensure lower maintenance and longer working life.

He highlights that Olikara’s QubePower is the only range in the world that offers a manual tilting option for the lamp. Enhancing the safety of the equipment is the worm-winch, for a lower load when raising the tower; this is a safer alternative to the ratchet winch since the basic gear design is self-locking.

“The modular design ensures that QubePower lighting towers are future-proof, and that all new innovations fit the existing towers,” he says. “This extends the life of the light towers, while allowing customers to benefit from the latest technologies.”

PUMP WITH THE RIGHT ACCESSORIES, ADVISES IPR

When a customer needs a dewatering solution, they might not always be able to specify the exact accessories that must accompany the pump to get the best outcome – which is where IPR can help.

“With our wide range of accessories, and our depth of experience in dewatering and slurry pumping, we can advise our customers on what they need,” says Steve du Toit, Sales Manager at IPR. “We can provide these requirements from our extensive stockholding of pump accessories, so that our recommended solution does the job when it is installed.”

Common accessories in pumping solutions include lay-flat hoses, suction hoses, foot valves, HDPE piping and hose flotation devices, explains Du Toit. These must all be sized and specified according to the demands of the selected pump and the duty that the application demands. 

“Correct sizing of pipes – according to their internal diameter – is one of the essential starting points,” he says. “Lay-flat hoses can be used on the discharge end, while rigid pipes are necessary for the suction side.” 

Flow meters may also be required, to provide customers with an accurate rate of water flow at the discharge point of the pump. This is vital information to demonstrate that the expected volumes of water are being removed for the customer’s purpose; it may also be a requirement of the customer’s water use licence. 

“There are also the electrical components to consider, so the pump control systems need to be designed to suit the pump and its application,” he says. “Measurement devices such as gauges on the suction port and delivery port are also important to monitor that the pump is operating at optimal efficiency.”

He highlights that IPR offers a custom range of accessories, and spends time carefully assessing each customer’s specific site conditions and technical infrastructure. This ensures that all aspects of the solution are attended to, with high quality accessories provided wherever necessary. 

With the growing focus on environmental impact management, Du Toit points to the value of accessories such as dewatering bags. These porous bags catch and retain sediments and other material that could contaminate the natural environment. At the same time, they allow cleaner water to seep out, facilitating dewatering in a responsible manner.

“Among the most important accessories are the flotation devices for our hoses and pumps,” he says. “On diesel driven self-priming units, for instance, we recommend that customers use suction hose floats to prevent the hose end from sucking in mud and stones – resulting in damage to the pump unit itself.”

Similarly, with submersible electric pumps it is advisable to use a pump flotation device (PFD). This ensures that the pump is always just below the surface of the water. It therefore does not become buried in mud or silt, which could undermine its performance and cause mechanical damage. The use of a PFD also makes it easy to locate the pump, while the floats show where the discharge piping and electrical cable is positioned at all times. 

Another protection measure that IPR can provide is a non-return valve, which is installed in the discharge pipe in close proximity to the pump. This ensures there is no back-pressure on the pump from water in the pipe; this type of pressure can cause serious damage such as shaft breakage when the pump is started.

“With a submersible pump, there is also the danger of this pressure causing the pump impeller to spin in the wrong direction when started – causing the impeller to loosen,” he says. 

Finally, he recommends that the accessories used with pumps should always be of a high quality. The risk of malfunction is costly and well beyond the savings on a cheaper item, emphasises Du Toit, and ‘buying cheap’ invariably leads to ‘buying twice’. For this reason, IPR invests only in quality accessories that customers can rely on. 

STREAMLINING PUMP SELECTION: THE POWER OF THE ATLAS COPCO ALGORITHMS

The Atlas Copco pump selection programme, available to IPR customers via the company’s website, offers a range of benefits that can greatly enhance the pump selection process. IPR is a specialised dewatering and dredging pump specialist and is the master distributor for Atlas Copco pumps in southern Africa. Ruaan Venter, Business Development Manager at IPR, highlights the advantages customers can enjoy when using this programme.

One of the key advantages is the programme’s ability to provide accurate pump selection. By inputting relevant parameters such as flow rate, pressure requirements, fluid type and site conditions, the programme can recommend the most suitable pump model. This ensures that customers obtain a pump that meets their specific needs, minimising the risk of oversizing or under sizing the equipment.

Time and cost savings are another significant benefit of the Atlas Copco pump selection programme. “Instead of manually researching and comparing various pump models, customers can rely on the programme’s recommendations,” Venter says. “This streamlines the selection process enabling faster decision-making. Additionally, selecting the appropriate pump from the start, irrespective of the application, avoids costly mistakes such as equipment failure or excessive energy consumption.”

The programme also focuses on enhancing efficiency and performance. It considers variables such as duty cycle, system pressure and hydraulic losses to optimise the pump’s efficiency. Venter explains that by operating at its highest efficiency point, the pump can achieve energy savings and improved overall performance, resulting in lower operating costs and increased productivity.

Comprehensive pump information is another valuable feature of the programme. Customers can access detailed specifications, performance curves, power requirements, dimensions and other relevant data for each recommended Atlas Copco pump model. This enables customers to evaluate and compare different pump options, empowering them to make informed decisions based on their specific requirements.

Moreover, Venter emphasises, IPR customers using the Atlas Copco pump selection programme have access to technical support from the company’s pump experts. “If customers have any questions or require additional guidance during the pump selection process, they can rely on our support team for personalised and reliable assistance, ensuring customers receive ongoing support throughout their equipment selection journey,” he says.

A gamechanger in the pump selection process, the programme is simple to use and users provide specific parameters including flow rate, pressure or head requirements, fluid properties and site conditions. These input parameters lay the foundation for accurate pump selection, and this information is used to perform hydraulic calculations which consider factors such as friction losses, elevation changes, system restrictions and fluid properties to determine the required pump performance.

Using the hydraulic calculations, the programme matches the user’s requirements with the available pump models in the Atlas Copco range. To do this, it considers pump type, size, efficiency curves and technical specifications to identify the most suitable options, and then provides performance analysis of the selected pump models. The programme generates performance curves, offering insights into the pump’s efficiency, head-flow characteristics, power consumption and other performance indicators.

Venter says that users can compare multiple pump models side by side using the programme. “This feature allows them to assess performance, efficiency, dimensions and other key characteristics, all aiding at facilitating an informed decision,” he says.

The Atlas Copco pump selection programme was designed with the primary aim of optimising the pump selection process, and provided the correct input parameters are provided it will recommend the most efficient pump size, impeller configuration and other features that could enhance performance while meeting user requirements.

Depending on the application, the programme factors in material compatibility, environmental regulations, noise levels and other site-specific requirements to ensure the selected pump is suitable for the given conditions.

Venter says the algorithms typically employ hydraulic calculations, performance modelling, database integration, optimisation techniques and user-friendly interfaces. 

The algorithm begins with hydraulic calculations, using the user’s input to determine pressure requirements, flow rates, head losses and other hydraulic parameters. Factors like fluid properties, pipeline dimensions, elevation changes and system restrictions are considered. 

Performance modelling comes into play as the algorithm uses pump-specific performance curves and mathematical models. These models are based on empirical data and extensive testing, allowing the algorithm to match the hydraulic calculations with the pump performance models to identify suitable options.

Database integration is crucial, as the algorithm accesses a comprehensive database of pump models with technical specifications, performance curves, efficiency data, and other relevant information. It compares the hydraulic calculations against the database to find pumps that meet the required performance parameters.

Optimisation techniques may be employed to fine-tune the pump selection process. The algorithm considers factors such as energy efficiency, NPSH requirements, impeller size and other design parameters to optimise performance and reliability. It can provide recommendations based on these optimisations.

To ensure user-friendliness, the algorithm is integrated into a software interface and is available as an online tool on the IPR website. This interface allows users to input their requirements, view performance data, compare pump models and receive recommendations. The algorithm processes the user input and presents the outputs in a clear and accessible manner.

“Of particular significance is that Atlas Copco’s specific algorithm includes additional components and refinements tailored, and was developed leveraging expertise, experience and extensive pump knowledge resulting in a robust and accurate algorithm for pump selection, “ Venter concludes. 

STREAMLINING PUMP SELECTION: THE POWER OF THE ATLAS COPCO ALGORITHMS

The Atlas Copco pump selection programme, available to IPR customers via the company’s website, offers a range of benefits that can greatly enhance the pump selection process. IPR is a specialised dewatering and dredging pump specialist and is the master distributor for Atlas Copco pumps in southern Africa. Ruaan Venter, Business Development Manager at IPR, highlights the advantages customers can enjoy when using this programme.

Ruaan Venter, Business Development Manager at IPR.
Ruaan Venter, Business Development Manager at IPR.

One of the key advantages is the programme’s ability to provide accurate pump selection. By inputting relevant parameters such as flow rate, pressure requirements, fluid type and site conditions, the programme can recommend the most suitable pump model. This ensures that customers obtain a pump that meets their specific needs, minimising the risk of oversizing or under sizing the equipment.

Time and cost savings are another significant benefit of the Atlas Copco pump selection programme. “Instead of manually researching and comparing various pump models, customers can rely on the programme’s recommendations,” Venter says. “This streamlines the selection process enabling faster decision-making. Additionally, selecting the appropriate pump from the start, irrespective of the application, avoids costly mistakes such as equipment failure or excessive energy consumption.”

The programme also focuses on enhancing efficiency and performance. It considers variables such as duty cycle, system pressure and hydraulic losses to optimise the pump’s efficiency. Venter explains that by operating at its highest efficiency point, the pump can achieve energy savings and improved overall performance, resulting in lower operating costs and increased productivity.

Comprehensive pump information is another valuable feature of the programme. Customers can access detailed specifications, performance curves, power requirements, dimensions and other relevant data for each recommended Atlas Copco pump model. This enables customers to evaluate and compare different pump options, empowering them to make informed decisions based on their specific requirements.

Moreover, Venter emphasises, IPR customers using the Atlas Copco pump selection programme have access to technical support from the company’s pump experts. “If customers have any questions or require additional guidance during the pump selection process, they can rely on our support team for personalised and reliable assistance, ensuring customers receive ongoing support throughout their equipment selection journey,” he says.

A gamechanger in the pump selection process, the programme is simple to use and users provide specific parameters including flow rate, pressure or head requirements, fluid properties and site conditions. These input parameters lay the foundation for accurate pump selection, and this information is used to perform hydraulic calculations which consider factors such as friction losses, elevation changes, system restrictions and fluid properties to determine the required pump performance.

Using the hydraulic calculations, the programme matches the user’s requirements with the available pump models in the Atlas Copco range. To do this, it considers pump type, size, efficiency curves and technical specifications to identify the most suitable options, and then provides performance analysis of the selected pump models. The programme generates performance curves, offering insights into the pump’s efficiency, head-flow characteristics, power consumption and other performance indicators.

Venter says that users can compare multiple pump models side by side using the programme. “This feature allows them to assess performance, efficiency, dimensions and other key characteristics, all aiding at facilitating an informed decision,” he says.

The Atlas Copco pump selection programme was designed with the primary aim of optimising the pump selection process, and provided the correct input parameters are provided it will recommend the most efficient pump size, impeller configuration and other features that could enhance performance while meeting user requirements.

Depending on the application, the programme factors in material compatibility, environmental regulations, noise levels and other site-specific requirements to ensure the selected pump is suitable for the given conditions.

Venter says the algorithms typically employ hydraulic calculations, performance modelling, database integration, optimisation techniques and user-friendly interfaces.

The algorithm begins with hydraulic calculations, using the user’s input to determine pressure requirements, flow rates, head losses and other hydraulic parameters. Factors like fluid properties, pipeline dimensions, elevation changes and system restrictions are considered.

Performance modelling comes into play as the algorithm uses pump-specific performance curves and mathematical models. These models are based on empirical data and extensive testing, allowing the algorithm to match the hydraulic calculations with the pump performance models to identify suitable options.

Database integration is crucial, as the algorithm accesses a comprehensive database of pump models with technical specifications, performance curves, efficiency data, and other relevant information. It compares the hydraulic calculations against the database to find pumps that meet the required performance parameters.

Optimisation techniques may be employed to fine-tune the pump selection process. The algorithm considers factors such as energy efficiency, NPSH requirements, impeller size and other design parameters to optimise performance and reliability. It can provide recommendations based on these optimisations.

To ensure user-friendliness, the algorithm is integrated into a software interface and is available as an online tool on the IPR website. This interface allows users to input their requirements, view performance data, compare pump models and receive recommendations. The algorithm processes the user input and presents the outputs in a clear and accessible manner.

“Of particular significance is that Atlas Copco’s specific algorithm includes additional components and refinements tailored, and was developed leveraging expertise, experience and extensive pump knowledge resulting in a robust and accurate algorithm for pump selection, “ Venter concludes.

THE ROLE OF CUTTER FANS IN PUMP AGITATION

The integration of innovative features during pump design has significantly enhanced performance and efficiency, with significant benefits for lowering total cost of ownership. One such component, the cutter fan, plays a crucial role in achieving effective agitation and solids handling. 

Ruaan Venter, Business Development Manager at IPR – the official distributor of Toyo heavy duty slurry pumps in southern Africa, sheds light on the functions and applications of these components, offering valuable insights into their importance in pump systems.

Cutter Fans: Enhancing Agitation and Solids Handling

The cutter fan, also known as an agitator, has revolutionised heavy-duty submersible dredge pumps. Toyo Pumps was the pioneering manufacturer to incorporate this type of agitation into its designs. Venter says that their patented curved three-blade stirring attachment, threaded onto the pump shaft just below the suction inlet, became a gamechanger in handling solids-laden slurries.

The primary function of the cutter fan is to dislodge and re-suspend solids, creating a slurry. As fluid flows towards the pump suction, the cutter fan redirects a portion of the fluid away from the pump, generating a fanning effect. This redirection and cyclic process result in a concentrated “pocket” of high solids content slurry directly in front of the pump suction inlet. This maximises the pumping efficiency and effectiveness, making it an essential feature for dredge pumps.

To protect the cutter fan, a stand is attached to the bottom of the pump. For larger pumps, an additional stub shaft is placed between the pump’s main shaft and the cutter fan, providing extra protection and stability during operation.

Differentiating Between Cutter Fans and Other Components

During pump installation, it is crucial to differentiate the cutter fan from other components. Operating the pump with a reversed rotation can lead to unscrewing of components during operation, resulting in potential damages and costly repairs.

To identify a cutter fan correctly, it is advisable to consult the pump’s rotational arrow. The cutter fan is easily visible and recognisable, as it pushes fluid away from the pump for agitation purposes. Observing the marked arrow during pump wiring ensures the correct rotation and installation of the cutter fan.

Cutter fans have significantly contributed to the efficiency and effectiveness of pump systems, particularly in managing solids and enhancing agitation. With a deeper understanding of the roles played by the cutter fan’s ability to redirect fluid and maximise solids management exemplify the advancements in pump technology. By correctly identifying and using cutter fans, pump operators can ensure optimal performance and avoid unnecessary operational issues,” Venter concludes. 

The Role of Cutter Fans in Pump Agitation

The integration of innovative features during pump design has significantly enhanced performance and efficiency, with significant benefits for lowering total cost of ownership. One such component, the cutter fan, plays a crucial role in achieving effective agitation and solids handling.

Ruaan Venter, Business Development Manager at IPR – the official distributor of Toyo heavy duty slurry pumps in southern Africa, sheds light on the functions and applications of these components, offering valuable insights into their importance in pump systems.

Cutter Fans: Enhancing Agitation and Solids Handling

The cutter fan, also known as an agitator, has revolutionised heavy-duty submersible dredge pumps. Toyo Pumps was the pioneering manufacturer to incorporate this type of agitation into its designs. Venter says that their patented curved three-blade stirring attachment, threaded onto the pump shaft just below the suction inlet, became a gamechanger in handling solids-laden slurries.

The primary function of the cutter fan is to dislodge and re-suspend solids, creating a slurry. As fluid flows towards the pump suction, the cutter fan redirects a portion of the fluid away from the pump, generating a fanning effect. This redirection and cyclic process result in a concentrated “pocket” of high solids content slurry directly in front of the pump suction inlet. This maximises the pumping efficiency and effectiveness, making it an essential feature for dredge pumps.

To protect the cutter fan, a stand is attached to the bottom of the pump. For larger pumps, an additional stub shaft is placed between the pump’s main shaft and the cutter fan, providing extra protection and stability during operation.

Differentiating Between Cutter Fans and Other Components

During pump installation, it is crucial to differentiate the cutter fan from other components. Operating the pump with a reversed rotation can lead to unscrewing of components during operation, resulting in potential damages and costly repairs.

To identify a cutter fan correctly, it is advisable to consult the pump’s rotational arrow. The cutter fan is easily visible and recognisable, as it pushes fluid away from the pump for agitation purposes. Observing the marked arrow during pump wiring ensures the correct rotation and installation of the cutter fan.

Cutter fans have significantly contributed to the efficiency and effectiveness of pump systems, particularly in managing solids and enhancing agitation. With a deeper understanding of the roles played by the cutter fan’s ability to redirect fluid and maximise solids management exemplify the advancements in pump technology. By correctly identifying and using cutter fans, pump operators can ensure optimal performance and avoid unnecessary operational issues,” Venter concludes.

IPR OFFERS VERSATILE TOYO VH AMPHIBIOUS PUMPS FOR DIVERSE APPLICATIONS

Amphibious heavy-duty pumps like the Toyo VH range, available from IPR – the official southern African distributor for this range – are designed to operate effectively in challenging environments where versatility and durability are paramount. These robust pumps can function both above the water (dry) and under the water (submerged), making them an ideal solution for diverse applications across the mining, oil and gas, construction and agricultural sectors.

In the mining industry, these pumps play a crucial role in dewatering – the removal of water infiltrating open pit and underground mines. Their capability to handle heavy and abrasive slurries is also instrumental in the construction sector, particularly in dewatering building sites and during tunnel construction. They can operate either partially or completely submerged. Notably, a compact version with an inline outlet discharge is beneficial in tunnelling works where space is a limitation.

The Toyo VH range of amphibious pumps can manage slurries with densities of at least 1.25kg/dm³ and solid contents up to 55% by weight.
The Toyo VH range of amphibious pumps can manage slurries with densities of at least 1.25kg/dm³ and solid contents up to 55% by weight.

Ruaan Venter, Business Development Manager at IPR, says the usefulness of the Toyo VH amphibious pump extends to environmental clean-up and remediation efforts, where these units will effectively and efficiently pump out contaminated groundwater or surface water, even when the water is laden with solids or sediment.

“In wastewater treatment facilities, Toyo VH pumps handle sludge and other dense materials, while in the agricultural industry, these amphibious pumps are key in irrigation and drainage systems, especially in flood-prone areas. Their ability to function both submerged and above water is crucial in maintaining optimal growing conditions by controlling water levels in fields.”

The industrial sector also heavily relies on these pumps’ versatility. They are used in processing plants across industries such as food processing, chemical and petroleum, where they handle slurries. Their robust construction allows them to manage corrosive and abrasive fluids, solidifying them as a reliable choice for demanding industrial environments.

Constructed with a unique design and incorporating a semi-open impeller, ample passageways for solids, heavy-duty shaft and bearing configuration and double mechanical seals operating in an oil bath, the Toyo VH pumps are primed for demanding tasks. They can function as priming or booster pumps and are installed on a frame with a strainer or with a fixing cone, with or without an agitator. Models from the Toyo VH15 and larger come equipped with an adjustable wear plate to optimise hydraulic efficiency.

These pumps can manage slurries with densities of at least 1.25kg/dm³ and solid contents up to 55% by weight. They can handle solid particles up to 80mm in diameter and liquid temperatures up to 60°C with pH levels between 4 and 14.

Venter explains that one of the most important advantages is that the Toyo VH range features a unique agitator design that lifts sediment into suspension, enabling the continuous pumping of media with high solid concentrations.

Capable of operating at maximum depths of 30 metres, these pumps are suitable for surface applications or those requiring partial or total submersion. Special versions of Toyo VH pumps can handle solid content of up to 60% by weight and liquid temperatures up to 80°C. Variations in materials of construction, including stainless steel and specialised alloys, are available for applications with these extremely high temperatures.

IPR OFFERS VERSATILE TOYO VH AMPHIBIOUS PUMPS FOR DIVERSE APPLICATIONS

Amphibious heavy-duty pumps like the Toyo VH range, available from IPR – the official southern African distributor for this range – are designed to operate effectively in challenging environments where versatility and durability are paramount. These robust pumps can function both above the water (dry) and under the water (submerged), making them an ideal solution for diverse applications across the mining, oil and gas, construction and agricultural sectors. 

In the mining industry, these pumps play a crucial role in dewatering – the removal of water infiltrating open pit and underground mines. Their capability to handle heavy and abrasive slurries is also instrumental in the construction sector, particularly in dewatering building sites and during tunnel construction. They can operate either partially or completely submerged. Notably, a compact version with an inline outlet discharge is beneficial in tunnelling works where space is a limitation.

Ruaan Venter, Business Development Manager at IPR, says the usefulness of the Toyo VH amphibious pump extends to environmental clean-up and remediation efforts, where these units will effectively and efficiently pump out contaminated groundwater or surface water, even when the water is laden with solids or sediment. 

“In wastewater treatment facilities, Toyo VH pumps handle sludge and other dense materials, while in the agricultural industry, these amphibious pumps are key in irrigation and drainage systems, especially in flood-prone areas. Their ability to function both submerged and above water is crucial in maintaining optimal growing conditions by controlling water levels in fields.”

The industrial sector also heavily relies on these pumps’ versatility. They are used in processing plants across industries such as food processing, chemical and petroleum, where they handle slurries. Their robust construction allows them to manage corrosive and abrasive fluids, solidifying them as a reliable choice for demanding industrial environments.

Constructed with a unique design and incorporating a semi-open impeller, ample passageways for solids, heavy-duty shaft and bearing configuration and double mechanical seals operating in an oil bath, the Toyo VH pumps are primed for demanding tasks. They can function as priming or booster pumps and are installed on a frame with a strainer or with a fixing cone, with or without an agitator. Models from the Toyo VH15 and larger come equipped with an adjustable wear plate to optimise hydraulic efficiency.

These pumps can manage slurries with densities of at least 1.25kg/dm³ and solid contents up to 55% by weight. They can handle solid particles up to 80mm in diameter and liquid temperatures up to 60°C with pH levels between 4 and 14. 

Venter explains that one of the most important advantages is that the Toyo VH range features a unique agitator design that lifts sediment into suspension, enabling the continuous pumping of media with high solid concentrations. 

Capable of operating at maximum depths of 30 metres, these pumps are suitable for surface applications or those requiring partial or total submersion. Special versions of Toyo VH pumps can handle solid content of up to 60% by weight and liquid temperatures up to 80°C. Variations in materials of construction, including stainless steel and specialised alloys, are available for applications with these extremely high temperatures.