ECONOMICAL NEW FINISHING PLASTER SETS NEW BENCHMARK

MetaCote is a new, smoother and more economic finishing plaster that promises to take the South African market by storm.

According to Gavin Coulson, managing director of Metadynamics, the innovative product sets a new benchmark for smoothness and consistency. It is also a high purity product, containing 95% synthetic gypsum.

“MetaCote is a locally developed, high-strength gypsum plaster used for basecoat and finishing plaster,” says Coulson. “In our trials, users have been particularly impressed by its smoothness and longer workability. It has certainly exceeded their expectations.”

He says it is ideal as a multi-purpose plaster for internal applications onto brickwork, concrete blocks and dry walling. It is also a perfect finishing plaster for sand-cement base coats. Layers can be finished from 3 mm to 6 mm in thickness.

“We are sure our competitive pricing will make MetaCote an attractive option not just for the larger contractors, but also for smaller and emerging contractors,” he says. “We are equally confident that the product will satisfy the end-consumer who wants a superior finish to their structures. It will at the same time add value to the businesses of contractors and subcontractors.”

It will be available at major building material retail outlets in 25 kg and 40 kg bags for easy mobility.

Coulson also emphasises the environmental benefit inherent in Metacote. It comprises synthetic gypsum, rather than natural gypsum which has to be mined. South Africa’s natural gypsum deposits are located in the Northern Cape which adds transportation costs to the carbon footprint when this is used. The synthetic gypsum used in MetaCote, by contrast, is sourced as a by-product from phosphate fertiliser manufacture.

“Synthetic gypsum is also more eco-friendly as a binder, when compared to cement,” he says. “The production of one ton of gypsum binder generates one tonne less CO2 emissions and avoids the depletion of a further 1,5 tonnes of natural resources when compared to cement.”

Facebook Twitter Linkedin Digg Reddit Stumbleupon Email